The 2019 Ralph and Theresa Anselmo Resilience Award

Hi everyone,

Thank you so much to everyone who donated last year to the first-ever Ralph and Theresa Anselmo Resilience Award. The response was overwhelming! I had hoped to fund one award and raised enough to fund two. I am so grateful for everyone’s support. It means so much to my family and I.

If you would like to learn more about last year’s recipients, Hannah and Katherine, Northeastern did a great job sharing their stories:

https://news.northeastern.edu/2018/12/10/heres-what-one-northeastern-graduate-is-doing-to-help-students-handle-their-medical-expenses/
I am happy to announce that the award is coming back for Year 2! Here is a link to the GoFundMe page: https://www.gofundme.com/f/2019-anselmo-family-award

This year my goal is to fund two $1,000 awards for students registered with the Northeastern University Disability Resource Center. Any amount of support would be greatly appreciated, even if it’s just sharing the GoFundMe link.

I ended up raising over $2,800 last year, and the remaining $800 will be allocated towards this year’s awards. If I raise more than my goal, I will allocate it towards next year. Either way, your donation will be put to good use!

With your support, we have already been able to positively impact the lives of two students. I hope to make this an annual award that can help students for years to come!

For those learning about the award for the first time, here is the description:

The Ralph and Theresa Anselmo Resilience Award is an award that I have created at Northeastern University (my alma mater) in honor of my parents, Ralph and Terry.

The goal of this annual award is to provide monetary assistance to a student (or students) registered with Northeastern’s Disability Resource Center  (DRC). Although when I attended Northeastern I did not experience any of the symptoms of the muscle disease that I am living with today, it is a resource I would have used had the timing been different. I have met a handful of students registered with the DRC over the years, and they are some of the kindest, most driven students I have ever met.

As someone living with a progressive disability, I have benefitted from the support of others who have enabled me to achieve my goals and dreams, which included going back to school full-time to get my MBA. Many people have helped me along this journey, none more so than my parents.

My mom and dad have been instrumental in empowering me to succeed, even as my physical condition has deteriorated. They provide me assistance and support without ever asking for anything in return. My resilience today in facing my disease would not be possible without their help.

In the spirit of the example set by my parents, I want to help others achieve their goals and dreams. Specifically, I want to help Northeastern students registered with the DRC. The intent of the award is to provide a little more peace of mind to the recipient, whether it’s helping to purchase a piece of adaptive equipment they may need for the classroom, or putting the award towards books or room and board. How they decide to use the funds is at their discretion.

I am a firm believer that anyone of any ability level can do anything they set their mind to. However, we are only as successful, we are only as strong, as our support system around us.

Without my parents, I wouldn’t be where I am today. It is an honor to name this award after them!

Award Parameters:

It is a one-time award of $1,000 each for two students. Any funds raised above and beyond the goal will go towards future awards. I will keep everyone up to date on how the funds are allocated.

Eligibility:

–          Any Northeastern sophomore, middler or junior year student with a GPA above 2.0.

–          Must be registered with the Disability Resource Center.

–          Student must provide a statement of what they plan to do with the award and why it will help them on their college journey.

How the funds can be used:

–          The award can be used on anything school-related, such as: tuition, an assistive technology device, books or room and board.

I will follow up once the award has been announced. Thank you in advance to everyone for your support!

 

 

Road Trip, Part 1

Oh, hi there!

Yes, yes, I know. I haven’t written in a while. I am well aware. I guess you can say I’ve had a bit of writer’s block recently, and with the MDA Clinical & Scientific conference fast approaching, I also had a handy excuse not to write for a few weeks.

Which is a good thing, because the conference, and the road trip to Orlando, gave me a lot to write about.

Although I wasn’t technically on the road each day, I was away from home for three weeks, which seemed like an eternity. That is a long time to go without my adjustable bed.

But all in all, it was worth it. I had a great time at the conference, and also had a chance to see my sister and her family for a few days, which made the aches and pains of a long car trip bearable.

Rather than write a long narrative, I feel like making a list instead. I like lists. Most importantly, it’s easier to insert GIFs into a list.

This particular list is not ranked in any order. Instead, it’s 18 thoughts to commemorate the 18 days I was away from home. At least, that’s what I counted on the calendar. If it turns out to be more or less, too late.

This post is broken up into two parts. Even in list form, I can’t help but write thousands of words.

Continue reading “Road Trip, Part 1”

Between Then and Now

It’s been a while since my last book update.

I am happy to say that I am still making progress, albeit slowly. Working full-time only affords me limited energy at the end of the day to type coherent sentences, but it is progress nonetheless. In the beginning, I was keeping track of how many pages I had written. Although by now I’ve lost track, I am well over 300 at this point.

Instead of tracking page count, the way I measure my writing progress is by where I am in my story. Right now, I am in late 2012, right on the cusp of the most emotional two months of my life. January and February 2013 was a defining period that changed the trajectory of my life forever. Even now, it still elicits mixed emotions. The pain of loss. The frustration of dealing with a rapidly-weakening body. The nostalgia of living and working in Boston. The satisfaction of realizing just how much I’ve grown since that time. Continue reading “Between Then and Now”

A Post I Wrote on LinkedIn

Hi everyone,

Quick post today. Just wanted to let you know about an article I self-published on LinkedIn called “‘I Can Do This’​: Six Ways to Handle Job-Related Adversity and Get Your Career Back on Track.”

Why did I write it? In the last few weeks I’ve had conversations with friends who are dealing with job uncertainty in some way. A couple have lost their jobs, and several others feel dissatisfied in their current position or are fearful of what the future holds.

Of course, as I’ve written about many times on this blog, I underwent my own job-related challenges last year. Considering my goal in 2019 is to write more advice-related posts that draw on my life experience, I figured this was a good place to start!

Let me know what you think and feel free to share with anyone who might benefit from it.

Back to Zero

In the back of my mind is an internal clock, one that tracks the time that has elapsed since my last fall. Well, it doesn’t count the exact days (it’s not that good), but it knows that my last fall was on the Fourth of July 2018, a little more than six months ago. I remember that day vividly. I was in North Carolina visiting my sister, and after watching the fireworks on TV, I retired for the night. As I was about to climb into bed, my right knee bumped into the box spring, causing me to lose my balance and crumple to the floor. I was shaken up but otherwise unhurt.

To go six months without a fall, given my advanced weakness, is a miracle in itself. But I knew my good fortune wouldn’t last, that eventually the clock would reset one of these days, in sudden and violent fashion.

That day was Thursday.

Continue reading “Back to Zero”

2019 Blog Topics – Welcome Your Input

Hi everyone,

I hope everyone is having a great start to 2019!

I am planning out my content calendar for the next few months and wanted to quickly reach out and ask my readers: Are there any topics you’d like me to write about this year? Anything related to my patient experience? Random subjects that have nothing to do with disability?

Let me know! I welcome your input.

At least, as long as it’s something I want to write about…

A Pain in the Nose

For as long as I can remember, headaches have been a part of my life. I don’t know how old I was when I got my first headache, but I distinctly remember crushing, nausea-inducing sinus pain in middle school. My pediatrician at the time referred me to a headache specialist – a serious, middle-aged man with silver hair and thick glasses – who asked me in my first appointment to describe the pain. I pointed to the base of my nose, my forehead and the back of my neck. “Pretty much everywhere,” I said.

The doctor recommended an MRI to see if he could find the source of my headaches, and also to see why I couldn’t smell. Perhaps, he said, they were related. I had never heard of an MRI before but it was an excuse to miss school, so I was cool with it.

Continue reading “A Pain in the Nose”